Geographies of Forced Eviction: Dispossession, Violence, Insecurity

5 August 2014

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Forced eviction, claims UN-Habitat, is a “global phenomenon” and “global crisis”. Figures published by the agency indicate that during the 2000s at least 15 million people globally were forcibly evicted. According to Amnesty International forced evictions are “when people are forced out of their homes and off their land against their will, with little notice or none at all, often with the threat or use of violence”. Today, forced evictions in the name of ‘progress’ are attracting attention as growing numbers of people in the Global South are ejected and dispossessed from their homes, often through intimidation, coercion and the use of violence. At the same time, we have also witnessed the intensification of a ‘crisis’ urbanism in the Global North characterised by new forms of social inequality, heightened housing insecurity and violent displacement. These developments have led to an explosion of forced evictions supported by new economic, political and legal mechanisms.

It is against this background that the Royal Geographical Society-Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) conference (August 27-29th 2014) will feature two sessions I have co-organised with Melissa Fernández Arrigoitia and Alex Vasudevan on ‘Geographies of Forced Eviction: Dispossession, Violence, Insecurity’.

More details about the presentations being given can be found here and here. They include my own paper which will be presented on ‘Lotus-wielding activism against forced eviction in Cambodia: Gendered dynamics of the Boeung Kak Lake case’. Garnering both national and international attention, Boeung Kak Lake (BKL) is the most high profile case of forced eviction in Cambodia. In February 2007, 133 hectares of the lake and surrounding area were leased for 99 years from the Municipality of Phnom Penh to a Chinese-backed private development company. In contravention of the country’s 2001 Land Law, the company proceeded to forcibly evict thousands of families and in August 2008 began filling the lake sand destroying further homes. Still more remain under threat. Through in-depth (repeat) interviews with men and women from BKL between 2013-2014 I will explore gendered perspectives on, and experiences of, forced eviction and its contestation. My presentation charts how women have become lotus-wielding activists at the forefront of community protest and foregrounds the gendered dynamics that have emerged within private and public spaces of the city. Its analysis departs from a forthcoming paper in Annals of the Association of American Geographers entitled: ‘The Whole World Is Watching’: Intimate Geopolitics of Forced Eviction and Women’s Activism in Cambodia.

In connection to the two RGS-IBG sessions, Melissa and Alex have also organised a related film screening of Rent Rebels at the Goethe Institut, London on August 28th. This new documentary by Gertrud Schulte Westenberg and Matthias Coers is a kaleidoscope of the tenants’ struggles in Berlin against their displacement out of their neighbourhood communities. All welcome! Further info here.

Based on the sessions, we have also organised a jointly edited book (by the same name). It represents the first collection of international academic research on contemporary forced evictions. In bringing together accounts from across urban Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America, it will breach a significant geographic and conceptual divide that has tended to frame forced evictions either as an overwhelmingly Global South phenomenon, or as an experience more common to the rural, landless poor. The chapters will move away from such geographically-restricted and partial understandings of forced evictions to consider the distinct urban logics of precarious housing or involuntary displacements that stretch across cities like London, Accra and Rio de Janeiro to Colombo, Shanghai and Madrid.

For more information on any of the above, please get in touch.

New research report on domestic violence law in Cambodia

19 January 2014

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New preliminary research report available for download here.

Based on two years of ESRC/DFID funded research in collaboration with the NGO Gender and Development/Cambodia and Dr Bunnak Poch, the report deepens understanding of why investments in domestic violence law are faltering and what action can be taken.

It is envisaged that the report will inform the country’s 2nd National Action Plan to Prevent Violence Against Women (NAPVAW) 2013–2017 led by the Ministry of Women’s Affairs and will help address concerns raised by the CEDAW 2013 Committee examination of Cambodia which found ‘limited progress in the prevention and elimination of violence against women’.

Feedback and other (media) enquiries are welcomed and should be directed to Katherine via the contact details on the front-page of this site.

To date the report’s findings have features in the Cambodian national press in The Phnom Penh Post and Cambodia Daily.

I will be speaking at the Center for Khmer Studies in Phnom Penh on February 3rd. Please see the flyer for further information.

Thanks to Bison Bison for the design of the report.

RGS-IBG 2014 CFP: Geographies of Forced Eviction

2 January 2014

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Geographies of Forced Eviction: Dispossession, Violence, Insecurity

Call for Papers: Royal Geographical Society with IBG Annual Conference, London, 27-29 August 2014.

Katherine Brickell, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway, University of London; Melissa Fernandez, LSE London, London School of Economics and Political Science; & Alex Vasudevan, School of Geography, University of Nottingham.

(Sponsored by Geographies of Justice Research Group and under review with Urban Geography Research Group)

Forced eviction, claims UN-Habitat (2011: viii), is a ‘global phenomenon’ and ‘global crisis’. Figures published by the agency indicate that during the 2000s at least 15 million people globally were forcibly evicted. Forced evictions are ‘when people are forced out of their homes and off their land against their will, with little notice or none at all, often with the threat or use of violence’ (Amnesty International: 2012, p.2). Today, forced evictions in the name of ‘progress’ are attracting heightened attention as growing numbers of people in the Global South are ejected and dispossessed from their homes, often through intimidation, coercion and the use of violence. At the same time, we have also witnessed the intensification of a ‘crisis’ urbanism in the Global North characterized by new forms of social inequality, heightened housing insecurity and violent displacement. These developments have led to an explosion of forced evictions supported by new economic, political and legal mechanisms. At this apposite time then, the session aims to explore forced evictions as ‘geographies that wound’ (Philo, 2005), and to consider what Geographers can offer to inform understanding of, and action against, this violation of the most basic of necessities.

Abstracts are invited which provide cutting-edge research on forced eviction in the Global North and/or South. Themes could include (but are not limited to):

• (Differentiated) dynamics, experiences and outcomes of forced eviction
• Forced eviction and rights infringements
• Forced eviction, resistance and housing activism
• Logics and theories of dispossession
• Emotional geographies of forced eviction
• ‘Root shock’ (Fullilove 2004) and ‘the wound’
• Home-unmaking and domicide
• Displacement and memory politics
• Homelessness and ‘resettlement’
• Development discourse and practice
• Urban (re)development
• (Geo)politics of forced eviction
• Bio-power and governance
• Forced eviction and the geolegal
• Historical geographies of forced eviction
• Postcolonial geographies of forced eviction
• Scholar activism
• Critical methodological reflections on research practice

We are looking for abstracts of 300 words to be sent to ALL session convenors by Monday 3rd February 2014 (Katherine.brickell@rhul.ac.uk/ M.Fernandez1@lse.ac.uk/ Alexander.Vasudevan@nottingham.ac.uk ). A special journal issue is planned from the session(s). Please indicate in your email if you would like to be part of this.

References:

Philo C (2005) The Geographies that Wound. Population, Space and Place 11(6): 441-454.

Fullilove M (2004) Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do about It, New York: One World.

United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) (2011) Forced Evictions: Global Crisis, Global Solution. Nairobi: UN-HABITAT.